Can you be sure your real estate agent is not a serial killer?

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Maybe not! A recent South Carolina arrest brings this terrifying issue to light. Consumers visit houses accompanied only by real estate agents in South Carolina every day. Is this practice safe?

In November, Todd Kohlhepp was arrested in connection with the deaths of three individuals whose bodies were found on his property in Woodruff. Investigators were on his property near Wofford Road when they heard banging. They found a kidnap victim alive inside a large metal container “chained like a dog”. The victim had been missing for two months.

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Todd Kohlhepp – photo by myfox8.com

Kohlhepp was charged with three counts of murder, three counts of possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime, and one count of kidnapping. Kohlhepp is also alleged to be connected with four slayings in 2003 at Superbike Motorsports in Spartanburg.

Kohlhepp was a South Carolina licensed real estate agent. Real estate agents in South Carolina are licensed by the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (LLR). A November 7 “Housing Wire” article asks how Kohlhepp got his license. The article quotes a prior article in “FOX Carolina” to the effect that LLR had stated Kohlhepp applied for a real estate license in 2006.

A background check was not required for the application. LLR’s website indicates an applicant who has been convicted or a crime must reveal that fact on the application and that the Real Estate Commission may review the application and conduct an investigation which may result in a delay in processing.

Kohlhepp had, in fact, been convicted of a 1986 kidnapping and rape in Arizona and had served 15 years in prison. But on his LLR application, according to FOX Carolina, he explained:

“I entered into a verbal agreement with my girlfriend who was also 15 at the time. I was charged with felony kidnapping due to the fact that I did have a firearm on me.”

He obtained the license and eventually established a firm of twelve agents and a reputation for being successful, professional, out-going and hard working. He was called a great salesman. He looked the part! He dressed well. He drove expensive cars.

What’s the lesson here? Consumers should eunderstand that a real estate agent’s license is no indication that the person who shows a home is honest and trustworthy.  Paying proper respect to the many, many wonderful real estate agents I know, however, it should be noted that we have seen cases in other parts of the country where real estate agents were harmed by their clients.

Unfortunately, for both sides of this equation, caution should be exercised in these situations of one-on-one contact with strangers in confined locations. Ask your friends for referrals. Do some on-line digging about the person you are about to meet. Take a business associate. Take a friend. Take your scary-looking cousin. Shoot, take your whole family. Schedule meetings during daylight hours. Let your business associates, friends and family know where you are, who you are with and how long you should be there. Keep your cell phone in your hand.

The good news is that this particular former real estate agent, who has confessed to the crimes, is likely to be off the streets permanently.

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2 thoughts on “Can you be sure your real estate agent is not a serial killer?

  1. Katie Conrad

    In 2009, I hired Kohlhepp to sell our house while my husband was working out of town during the week and only home on weekends. I met with him alone several times to interview him, then take measurements and pictures of my house. Then over the course of the listing, I saw him several more times. Nothing prepared me for the news that he is a kidnapper, rapist and murderer. It is terrifying to think what could have happened to me, and I think it is practically criminal that the SC Real Estate Commission gave him a license to sell real estate knowing that kidnapping and rape were part of his history, no matter what the “story”. I wrote them asking for change to their policies with respect to criminal records, background checks (Self-Reporting?? Bah!) and re-application requirements, but they didn’t bother to respond. I think realtors should be held to a higher standard because of the trust normal people place in them when buying or selling a house; riding in their cars, going with them to see empty houses, etc. It’s the perfect trap for a predator. Thank you for your article, and I for one will never enter a relationship with a realtor I don’t personally know well again, and never again will I be alone.

    Like

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