CFPB issues proposed rule to ban foreclosures until 2022

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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a notice on April 5 proposing an Amendment to Regulation X that would require a temporary COVID-19 emergency pre-foreclosure review period until December 31, 2021, for principal residences. This amendment would, in effect, stall foreclosures on principal residences until January of 2022. The press release, which can be read here, requests public comments on the proposal through May 10, 2021.

The press release states nearly three million borrowers are delinquent in mortgage payments and nearly 1.7 million will exit forbearance programs in September and the following months. The rule proposes to give these borrowers a chance to explore ways to resume making payments and to permit servicers to offer streamlined loan modification options to borrowers with COVID-related hardships.

Under current rules, borrowers must be 120 days delinquent before the foreclosure process can begin. Anticipating a wave of new foreclosures, the CFPB seeks to provide borrowers more time for the opportunity to be evaluated for loss mitigation.

Many provisions of the CARES Act apply only to federally backed mortgages, but the CFPB seeks, by this proposed rules change, to set a blanket standard across the mortgage industry.

Lawyers: Tell your clients, friends and family members!

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South Carolina launched a funded rental and mortgage assistance program

South Carolina’s Housing Authority announced last week a new funded program to assist residents who face financial difficulty in housing as a result of the pandemic.

The program, called SC Stay, has $25 million to be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis to qualified residents for rent and mortgage deficits dating back to February of 2020. Residents may receive up to a total of $7,500 for prior and/or future mortgage or rent payments. The funding is provided through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Community Development Block Grant Program for Coronavirus and is a part of the CARES Act.

To qualify, individuals and families must:

  • Certify that their income is at or below 80% of county medium income adjusted by family size. (A chart reflecting the requirement for each county is attached);
  • Demonstrate that they are unable to make all or part of their rent or mortgage payments or are behind on those payments because of circumstances stemming from COVID. Those circumstances may include layoffs, reduced work hours as well as the inability to work because of infection and quarantine.
  • Have landlord or lender confirmation of their past-due payments and willingness to accept payments on behalf of the tenant or borrower.

The application process can be started here or by calling (833) 985-2929.

South Carolina REALTORS® announces record year

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South Carolina real estate practitioners, if you thought 2020 was outrageously busy, there was an excellent reason for that. In the middle of a global pandemic, our state had a record year in home sales.

South Carolina REALTORS® (SCR) recently issued a press release reflecting the market data as of the close of 2020, stating that the number of sales closed in South Carolina in 2020 was 101,500, representing a 20% increase in closed sales, an increase in median price sales of 13% and a decrease in inventory of 40%.

SCR’s press release touted its efforts in fighting for real estate to be deemed an “essential service”. We want you to be aware that Chicago Title fought for that designation, too.

Despite these phenomenal numbers, it was clear that inventory was an issue through 2020 and remains an issue in early 2021. SCR’s press release states that as of the end of December, there were only 16,480 active home listings in our entire state, compared to 118,667 at the end of 2019.

And we all know that home prices were up. It was indeed a seller’s market! SCR reports that the overall median sales price increased in South Carolina by 12% to $245,000, and that sellers received, on average, 98% of their original list price. This represents a year-over-year improvement of 0.6%.

As we prepare for 2021, it appears to us that the trends of low inventory and higher prices in housing will continue at least through mid-year.

We’re hoping for continued good news in our marketplace as our population gets vaccinated and we are all able to move around more freely.

Here’s wishing for each of you a healthy, happy and prosperous 2021. And here’s wishing for the end of COVID for all of us sooner rather than later!

How does the rest of 2020 look in South Carolina housing?

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We have had an incredible year in real estate in South Carolina!

Mortgage rates are at historic lows resulting in a refinance boom. Home sales have also been strong. We have seen a steady stream of migrations to our beautiful state from less desirable locations. We have seen folks tire of being stuck inside their homes by COVID looking for larger and more modern residences. And the low interest rates have assisted in those moves, too.

And commercial real estate has remained strong for us. We’ve seen the due diligence periods of some commercial projects slowed by COVID uncertainty, but these transactions appear to be closing, even if later than expected.

Real estate closing attorneys and their staff members have worked at a frenzied pace this year! They have tried to keep up with the whirlwind of activity while sanitizing between closings, performing closings on porches, in tents and in parking lots. They’ve worn masks and given away the used pens. It has taken a great deal of innovation to run a closing law firm in this environment, and they have succeeded!

It’s almost October, and we haven’t yet seen a slowdown. I point you to this article, however, written by Warren L. Wise for Charleston’s Post and Courier newspaper. The article points to a slip in the numbers of real estate sales in August as compared to August of 2019. Sales seem to have been slowed by inventory. We are still experiencing a desire for new and improved housing, but the houses aren’t available. It’s a true seller’s market.

I doubt these numbers will result in a huge slow-down between now and the end of the year. Perhaps we will see something akin to the seasonal slowdowns we have historically seen toward year-end. And if things go well, spring will give us the typical increase we are accustomed to in housing sales. Hang on for the ride!

CDC announces COVID eviction moratorium through the end of 2020

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On Tuesday, September 1, the CDC announced a temporary eviction moratorium through December 31, 2020. The order applies to all rental units nationwide and goes into effect immediately. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that the order applies to around 40 million renters.

The CDC announced the action was needed to stop the spread of the coronavirus and to avoid having renters wind up in shelters or other crowded living conditions. This order goes further than the eviction ban under the CARES Act which covered around 12.3 million renters in apartment complexes of single-family homes financed with federally backed mortgages.

The Order, entitled, “Temporary Halt in Residential Evictions to Prevent the Further Spread of COVID-19, does not suspend mortgage foreclosures. To take advantage of the suspension, the tenant must sign a declaration form alleging:

  1. The individual has used best efforts to obtain all available government assistance for rent or housing;
  2. The individual either (i) expects to earn no more than $99,000 in annual income for Calendar Year 2020 (or no more than $198,000 if filing a joint tax return), (ii) was not required to report any income in 2019 to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, or (iii) received an Economic Impact Payment (stimulus check) pursuant to Section 2201 of the CARES Act;
  3. The individual is unable to pay the full rent or make a full housing payment due to substantial loss of household income, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, a lay-off, or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses;
  4. The individual is using best efforts to make timely partial payments that are as close to the full payment as the individual’s circumstances may permit, taking into account other nondiscretionary expenses; and
  5. Eviction would likely render the individual homeless— or force the individual to move into and live in close quarters in a new congregate or shared living setting— because the individual has no other available housing options.

The order specifically does not excuse rent, it just delays eviction. There is a substantial body of depression -era caselaw that holds this type of governmental action is permissible because it does not impair the contract, it only delays the remedy, and it is not a taking because the rent is still due. Lawsuits are likely to follow regardless of this old caselaw.

Many would argue that a temporary ban on eviction for non-payment burdens landlords with the cost of rental delay. Many landlords are individuals or small businesses that cannot spread the losses and cannot pay maintenance costs, mortgages and property taxes without the benefit of rental income.