A Short Time Ago in a Revenue Office Not Far Away …

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Check them out in DOR Information Letter #15-20

The South Carolina Department of Revenue (DOR) issued a Revenue Ruling and an Information Letter in 2015 addressing deed recording fees and the affidavits that must accompany deeds.

Revenue Ruling #15-3, issued earlier this year, contains a comprehensive treatment of the subject, and Information Letter #15-20, issued on December 11, creates new affidavit forms, the Affidavit for Taxable or Exempt Transfers and the Affidavit for Exempt Transfers. Former affidavits, created in 1996, and using the term “arm’s length transaction” were decertified.

darth vader

“Luke … I am your lawyer.”

Deed recording fees of $1.35 (state) and $.55 (county) per $500 or any fractional part of $500 of the value of the real estate are imposed by §12-24-10 of the South Carolina Code for the “privilege” of recording a deed. This has not changed. Also unchanged is the list of 15 exemptions, and the statement that deeds of distribution and deeds transferring property from a trust to a trust distributee upon the settlor’s death are not subject to the fees.

One statutory change from 2015 was addressed in the Information Letter. Code §2-59-140 was amended in June to provide in subjection (E) that deductions from “value” include “any lien or encumbrance on realty in the possession of a forfeited land commission which may subsequently be waived or reduced after the transfer under a signed contract or agreement between the lienholder and the buyer existing before the transfer.” This change was added to Item 5 of the Affidavit for Taxable and Exempt Transfers.

Real estate practitioners can find the Revenue Ruling and the Information Letter at www.dor.sc.gov. Be sure to use the new forms!

Trulia’s Blog Paints a Rosy Picture of Housing in SC for 2016

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Charleston is identified as the second hottest market in the country! Columbia is seventh!

_SC FlagIt’s budget time for me and for many real estate professionals. We are reading everything we can uncover on economic forecasts, and for me, the focus is real estate in South Carolina. Today, an interesting blog entitled “Housing in 2016—hesitant households, costly coasts, and the bargain belt” popped up in my newsfeed in Facebook. The blog, dated December 3, was written by Ralph McLaughlin of Trulia, the online residential real estate site for buyers, sellers, renters and real estate professionals.

As a part of its annual forecast for housing, Trulia commissioned Harris Poll to conduct a survey in November of about 2,000 Americans concerning their hopes and fears on housing. The survey indicated that the American Dream of home ownership is alive and well and continues its resurgence since the economic downturn.  The blog states that the percentage of Americans who dream of owning a home is up 1 point to 75% and up 2 points among millennials to 80%. But 22% of Americans believe it will be harder to get a mortgage in 2016.

Hesitant households in the title of the article is a reference to the obstacles consumers perceive to buying a home:  down payments, credit history, qualifying for a mortgage and increasing home prices are the top four.

Costly coasts are the expensive metro markets in the West and Northeast. Trulia is expecting those markets to cool because affordability has decreased, homes are staying on the market longer, and saving for a down payment is taking decades. In addition, consumers in those markets are pessimistic about housing.

The good news for us in The Palmetto State is that we are located in the so-called bargain belt, the highly affordable markets in the Midwest and South, where the survey shows consumers are upbeat about housing and where Trulia is expecting growth housing.

Trulia also identifies ten markets with the strongest potential for growth in 2016, and two of them are ours:

  1. Grand Rapids, Wyoming
  2. Charleston, South Carolina
  3. Austin, Texas
  4. Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  5. San Antonio, Texas
  6. Colorado Springs, Colorado
  7. Columbia, South Carolina
  8. Riverside-San Bernardino, California
  9. Las Vegas, Nevada
  10. Tacoma, Washington

Everyone paying attention is aware that the Federal Reserve has expressed a commitment to raising interest rates either by the end of the year or early in 2016, and we have seen the stock market respond each time Janet Yellen speaks on this topic. But if this projection and others that indicate the market in South Carolina will be strong in 2016 are correct, we should expect a strong 2016. Perhaps by the end of the first quarter, we will begin to feel the worst of the TRID transition is behind us, and we will be ready to embrace the growth we are anticipating.  Let’s all look forward to the ride!

SC Supreme Court Crafts New Foreclosure Law

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foreclosureFailure to file bond does not render appeal moot

In a case decided on November 4*, the Supreme Court of South Carolina interpreted S.C. Code §18-9-170** in a way that may come as a surprise to dirt lawyers.

The case arose from the foreclosure of an HOA lien. The absentee owner defaulted in the foreclosure and did not appeal. Instead, he moved to vacate the resulting sale. When his motion to vacate was denied, the master issued a deed to the successful bidder, and the defaulting owner appealed without filing an appeal bond.

The Court of Appeals dismissed the appeal, holding that the property owner failed to comply with the statute that would have stayed the sale, and, therefore the master-in-equity’s deed rendered the appeal moot.

The Supreme Court reversed and remanded the case to the Court of Appeals for a decision on the merits.

Real estate practitioners have likely read §18-9-170 to mean that failure to file a bond in this situation renders the appeal moot. This case indicates that the failure to file a bond may not be an issue. If no bond is filed, the master may issue the deed to the successful bidder, but the appeal can proceed. By implication, if the appeal is successful, then the purchaser’s deed may be set aside. The Court specifically stated that the master’s deed does not moot the appeal, and the appellate court may reach the merits.

For title examiners and the lawyers who rely on title examinations, this case means that whether or not an appeal bond has been filed, we must pay attention to a case on appeal.

* Wachesaw Plantation East Community Services Association, Inc., v. Alexander, Appellate Case No. 2012-21340, Opinion 27585

** S.C. Code §18-9-170 reads in relevant portion: “If the judgment appealed from directs the sale or delivery of possession of real property, the execution of the judgment shall not be stayed unless a written undertaking be executed….”